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Posts from the ‘Wine & Food’ Category

Pairing wine and pizza

Question from Harrison: There’s heaps of info out there on what wine to drink with restaurant food but what about everyday meals? What wine should I drink with my Friday night pizza?

In a nut shell: Return to the mother land of pizza and grab an Italian red. When in doubt it’s best to go for a wine that comes from the same place as the food. Although I know buying an Italian red can be daunting for us Aussies so read on for plenty of common grapes you can pair with your pizza. Read more

Pairing wine and chocolate

Question from Zoe: I love chocolate and I love wine but together I struggle to make them work. Can you suggest a delish chocolate and wine pairing for Easter?

In a nut shell: To be totally honest I’d avoid the two together. Chocolate and wine should never really be paired. They compete to impress the same taste buds and in doing so butt heads and fall over. The only time you can enhance the flavours of both is if you find a wine that’s sweeter than the chocolate you’re eating, which isn’t easy. Read more

Wine with coq-au-vin

Question from Heath: On the menu tonight is coq-au-vin which I am making with Cabernet Sauvignon. So is that what we should drink?

In a nut shell: I’d actually make it with Pinot Noir because that’s the perfect accompanying wine. Cook with a good Pinot and drink the rest! Read more

Wines to serve at a party

Question from Kathy: What wine should I serve at a party?

In a nut shell: Keep it simple and inexpensive and… Read more

Fabulous wine pairings with Christmas lunch

Question from Michael: We’re hosting Christmas lunch this year. Help! What wine should I serve?

In a nut shell: Let’s go with the simple order of light nibbles followed by seafood entrée, meat main and pudding for dessert. Nibbles will pair perfectly with Sparkling or Champagne. For a seafood entrée slick with a light white like Sauvignon Blanc, Riesling, Pinot Gris or Pinot Grigio. For main pair with a light red like Pinot Noir, Grenache or Beajolais and for the pudding sip on a Muscat, Port or Pedro Ximenez. That’s pretty general – read on as I get a little more specific depending on how rich the food is. Read more

Dessert wine for those with a savoury palate

Question from Heath: I’m in a sticky situation! I really don’t like sweet wines; I like a more dry wine (like my personality). I was at a restaurant the other day and we had a degustation with matching wines. It was lovely until dessert! The wine was so sweet I couldn’t drink it! Can you recommend something that goes with dessert that isn’t sweet?

In a nut shell: I sure can but you’re going to have to be specific about what you eat for dessert. No more crème brûléefor one thing and forget about chocolate cake! You’re going to have to stick to fruits and berries if you want to drink dry wines with your dessert.

In a clam shell: Lots of sugar was the reason why you were served a super sweet wine with dessert and that’s absolutely what you should have been served (sorry). A dry wine would taste bitter, sour, tart and would lose all its flavour if paired with something sweet (and there’s no point drinking that). Your wine should always be sweeter than the food it’s paired with and hence why we drink super sweet wines with sweet desserts. A sweeter wine with a sweet dessert should taste less sweet than if you had have drunk it on its own but still fragrant, aromatic and delicious. Read more

A match made in heaven

Question from Jo: Should I buy the wine first, or the cheese?

In a nut shell: The best thing about pairing cheese and wine is that there is a cheese match for every wine and a wine match for every cheese so in short it doesn’t really matter. If you’re craving an oaky Chardonnay start with the wine but if you’re dying for a stinky blue let the cheese do the talkin’.

*disclaimer – please excuse the glass… I was desperate… I had cheese, I had wine, I had a water glass… it was better than nothing.

In a clam shell: There are a lot of grape varieties out there and a lot of cheeses too so where do you start when pairing cheese and wine? Thankfully, there are a few general rules you can follow to ensure the perfect match. Read more

Drinking wine with chilli

Question from Heath: My partner loves any chilli Asian dish but we always struggle with the wine match. What do you recommend?

In a nut shell – Go with a fruity or sweet white wine (aromatic Riesling) or a red wine with low tannin (Pinot Noir, Grenache, Beaujolais) and make sure the wine you pick is relatively low in alcohol.

In a clam shell – Good question! Chilli food is always tricky to pair with wine. We pair particular wines with particular foods because if we get it wrong your wine is going to taste bland and flavourless. Read more

Avoiding dairy and eggs doesn’t mean sobriety

Question from Claire: Bonjour! I feel silly asking, but here it goes – is wine vegan?

Question from Laura: Does wine contain eggs and/or dairy?

In a nut shell – So I figure these questions are very similar and hence why I’m answering them together. Unfortunately, wine is not vegan and does contain traces of dairy and/or egg but don’t put down your glass just yet. It’s not that simple. Read on!

In a clam shell – At the end of the wine making process most winemakers will clear out the floaties and remove any unwanted flavours left in the wine (yeast, protein, cloudiness) before bottling it, by ‘fining’ the wine which involves adding a fining agent. The problem here is that fining agents are animal based products, namely isinglass (fish bladders), gelatine, casein (milk protein) and egg whites. Read more

Duck for dinner and a little Pinot talk

Question from Heath: I’m trying to impress someone special and am cooking duck for dinner but I have no idea what wine to have with it? Help!

In a nut shell – I don’t know what you plan to do with the duck so the safest bet here would be Pinot Noir. Pinot Noir and duck make the perfect pair! Want to know why? Keep reading! Your special someone is in for a treat!

In a clam shell – Tannin, I’m about to talk about tannin. Keep reading, I’ll make it simple! Tannin is that chalky, drying feeling in your mouth after a gulp of red wine. You know the one? When you feel like you’ve just sucked on a wet tea bag? If you’re still confused, do it and you’ll know exactly what I mean. Tannins are found in grape skins and are in higher levels in thick-skinned grapes (Cabernet Sauvignon, Shiraz/Syrah). Also, the longer the skin stays in contact with the wine, during the making of it, the higher the levels of tannin. Read more